C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

November 1, 2010

November 2010 Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 1:00 am

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

November 2010

 


Reference Collections

If you’ve been in the Library since the start of the Fall semester, you will have noticed that we moved some furniture around over the Summer break.  In doing so, we completely upended the organization of our Reference Collection.  This collection has always been a challenge for students to navigate– the call number ranges on the ends of the shelves can be confusing, the shelves are close to the ground and hard to browse.  Now, it’s even hard for the librarians to find our way around!  I, for one, knew the collection not by call number, but by plain old remembering the physical location of certain types of books on the shelf.  Now, everything has been turned around and a student’s guess is as good as mine when it comes to finding the Encyclopedia of Junk of Food.

The Reference Collection is a fun place to browse, though.  We have such a wide range of dictionaries, indexes and subject encyclopedias and we’re adding new material all the time. There’s always something to match anyone’s interest– whether it’s soccer, science fiction, space or swearing.

Reference books are also an excellent way to familiarize oneself with a new area of study.  Simply flipping through something like the Encyclopedia of Magic and Magicians or Mysterious Creatures: A Guide to Cryptozoology can provide a quick introduction to the breadth of a topic and the many related subtopics.

Students looking for background information or quick references, aren’t limited to the collection in the Library, however.  Reference resources are available 24/7 via an ever-increasing online collection that includes databases such as Credo Reference and the Gale Virtual Reference Library.  These collections allow students to search multiple reference titles (dictionaries, encyclopedias, biographies and more) simultaneously.  Need to know what the phrase “cold war” means?  A quick search in Credo yields articles from general reference sources as well as information from social science, history, literature and science sources. Students get images, maps, audio and links to biographies of related people.

I love learning new tidbits of information, but don’t always have time to read entire books (or even articles!) on subjects that interest me– that is why I’m a fan of reference books.  The content is easily accessible, presented in manageable-sized chunks of information, generally illustrated and eminently browsable.  I would encourage you and your students to explore the wonderful assortment of titles available here in the Library and online in our Reference Research Databases.  You’re bound to find something new and interesting!

Resource of the Month

WGBH American Experience – Teachers’ Area (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/teachers/index.html) makes it easy to bring American history into the classroom.  American Experience has been airing award winning documentaries since 1988 and many of those are available to watch in full from the PBS website (we have 100 episodes on DVD and VHS here in the Library!).  The Teachers’ Area allows instructors to “search or browse over 1,500 features from more than 110 American Experience Web sites — including timelines, primary sources, teacher’s guides, maps, galleries, interactives, video, and more — to find history, civics, and other social studies resources for your classroom.”

Browsing the Teachers’ Area allows you to see the breadth of American Experience’s historical coverage in a chronological listing that spans first European contact with Native Americans through contemporary issues.  A click on a topic, such as “Culture and Society” in the Civil War and Reconstruction era, reveals the many supporting materials available from the site– maps, primary sources, timelines.  A convenient box to left of the list allows you to narrow your results by feature and media type.  Text-based teachers guides also provide activities that use all of, or parts of, American Experience documentaries.

New Library Materials

Novel Scenes:

  • Low intermediate, Rooms with a view / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N684 2010 
  • High beginning, Holding the bag / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N683 2010
  • Low beginning, In a tight spot / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N682 2010
  • Low beginning, In a tight spot / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N682 2010

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library- Workplace

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library- Academics

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library – Civics:

Endeavor Series:
  • Endeavor. 8 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E528 2009
  • Endeavor. 7 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E547 2009
  • Endeavor. 6 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E526 2009
  • Endeavor. 5 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E525 2009
  • Endeavor. 4 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E524 2009

October 1, 2010

October 2010 Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 5:00 am

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

October 2010


LearningExpress Library Revisited

Learning Express logoI’ve posted several times in the past couple of years about the ever-popular online resources LearningExpress Library, but I thought I’d take a moment to highlight some features and share some experiences.

For those of you who are not familiar with LEL, it is a “comprehensive collection of test preparation tools, skill-building materials, and career resources”.  That’s how LearningExpress describes their product, anyway.  Here at the Library, we just call it “awesome”– it’s the most used database we subscribe to and we’re always learning something new and exciting about its many features.

The main content of the database is organized into seven Learning Centers which cover a wide range of subjects and interests, including GED Prep; Job Search and Workplace Skills; and Skills Improvements.  Each Learning Center features practice tests, preparation courses and courses of study.

For a new user, LearningExpress can seem overwhelming– there’s a lot of information and a lot of options.  Students (and instructors!) who are not comfortable with new online tools may take one look at the front page of LEL  and wonder “Now what?”

I generally steer students directly to the Learning Centers– here lies the real meat of LEL.  A Learning Center like “Skills Improvement”, however, features 5 areas of study and each area contains another number of options– courses, tests and practice.

Where should a student start?  The real answer, that it doesn’t matter– a student can start anywhere, doesn’t tend to alleviate any worries.  Here’s how I address the question “Where do I start?”

Let’s say a student needs to work on reading comprehension skills.  This area in the Skills Improvement Learning Center features the following options:  Reading Comprehension Practice, Reading Comprehension Diagnostic Tests and Reading Comprehension Courses.  If the student would like comprehensive instruction on the topic, I would recommend starting with the Courses– selecting one or more that match the areas of deficiency or working through the entire sequence.  If the student is familiar with the content but would like to gain confidence through exercises at various levels, I generally recommend the Practice tests and skill builders.  The Diagnostic Tests can be a good place to start for students who want to know what their strengths and weaknesses in this particular area are.

If you are interested in learning more about LearningExpress Library and what it has to offer, I suggest taking a look at the What Do I Do Now? topics featured on the bottom right-hand side of the LEL homepage.  Here you can view tutorials that describe each area of LEL, take a guided tour of the product and browse all of the Learning Center content as well as the extensive list of eBooks available to users.

Of course, you can always contact me with your questions as well!  I’m more than happy to give you or your students a guided tour of any of our resources.

Resource of the Month

Flashcard exchange logoFlashcardExchange (www.flashcardexchange.com) is a creative tool that allows users to create and share flashcards online.  Students and teachers can search an extensive collection of over 32 million user-created cards on any conceivable topic and level.  There are cards for elementary school subjects through college subjects, technology topics, medical topics and occupational topics.  Naturally, language flashcards are also available– from Arabic to Wolof.

While anyone can access existing flashcards, users must register in order to create their own flashcards.  Free registration allows users to create an unlimited number of flashcards, share and study online.  Advanced options, such as image and audio flashcards and printable cards, are available to users who register for a lifetime membership for $19.95.

FlashcardExchange is also available as an iPhone app for quizzing on-the-go.

August 17, 2010

September 2010 Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 10:55 am

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

August/September 2010


Welcome Back!

For those of you who don’t know me, I’m Jennifer Kelley, the library liaison for the ESL, ABE and GED programs.  I’m your contact person in the Library and also someone to whom you can refer your students.  Below, you’ll see a short list of “What Your Librarian Can Do for You”– these are just a few of the things I can help you with!

One of my favorite things to do for my faculty is to share this newsletter with you.  Every month, you can count on an update on Library news, lists of new or notable materials (books, videos, software), a recommended electronic resource, and more.

I’ll email you a link to the online newsletter as soon as it’s available, but you can always visit any time you like at https://codlibraryell.wordpress.com.  There you can see archived newsletters, the occasional newsflash update and a long list of online resources for you to explore.  You can even share your comments and questions right on the website!  If you’re more of a traditional print-out paper kind of person, don’t worry!  I always attach a PDF of the newsletter to the monthly email, as well.

Starting this Fall, the C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter will also be available from the Faculty pages of the new ESL and ABE/GED Research Guides.  You can explore the guides online at http://library.codlibrary.org/esl and http://library.codlibrary.org/abe

Library Tours and Orientations

Each semester, I look forward to meeting and working with the students taking ESL, ABE and GED classes.  You can schedule a Library tour or orientation for your students at any time during the school year, but I recommend getting them started early so they can take advantage of our resources immediately.

A library session can be short or the entire length of your class.  It can involve a research project or a simple assignment.  It can take place here in the Library or in your classroom– even if you’re off campus! Take a look at our Library Orientation menus for some ideas of the sessions and activities we can offer your students:

If you can’t fit a Library visit or activity into your schedule this semester, don’t worry– your students can still get an introduction to the Library.  During Chaparral Days (August 23-September 3), the Library will be offering 4 sessions of our popular workshop Introduction to the Library for New Students.

These  90-minute classes will cover all the basics that new students need to get started in the Library– from getting a Library card to using the online catalog to find books, movies and more.  Learn more about our Introduction to the Library for New Students workshops at http://library.codlibrary.org/sos/life

Students can register in-person at the Reference Desk, by phone (630) 942-3364, or online at http://services.codlibrary.org/emailpage/orientation.php

Sessions are geared toward traditional students, but will surely benefit higher-level ESL students as well as ABE and GED students looking to familiarize themselves with Library services.

As always, feel free to contact me directly with any questions you might have about workshops, instruction sessions, tours or anything else you can think of!

Resource of the Month

World Atlas

http://www.worldatlas.com

World Atlas is an interactive site featuring maps, photos, videos and descriptions of geographical locations.  A simple click on a map projection of the globe will provide information on the continents, oceans or feature such as the Prime Meridian or Equator.  From there, the user can easily drill down, for example, from the Arctic, to Asia, to Lake Baykal where in addition to descriptive facts of the region, World Atlas provides real time weather information and links to outside resources.

Additional features include a gallery of national, state and special flags,  links to outside services such as a currency converter and distance calculator, map clip art and population data.

World Atlas uses data from the CIA World Factbook and other freely available statistical resources, but also contributes original graphics and descriptions.

The site is easy to use and fun to explore, though pages generally feature ads for travel and related services.  World Atlas would be a useful addition to a social studies curriculum or a tool for discussing geographyand culture.

What Your Librarian Can Do for You

  • Help you to identify and locate ESL and ABE/GED resources for teaching and student use.
  • Support your students’ Library instruction via customized group sessions, library tours, and library card acquisition.
  • Collaborate with instructors  on the design and development of student assignments.
  • Find information to answer basic reference questions as well as assist you in locating information for ESL and ABE/GED curriculum related projects.
  • Assist you in finding and securing library materials from other libraries through Interlibrary Loan.

May 3, 2010

May 2010 Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 11:28 am

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

May 2010

Spending for a Sunny Day

Welcome to the end of the semester, everyone!  With only two weeks until graduation, the pace in the Library slows significantly– in contrast, I’m sure to the pace everywhere else on campus.  My last library instruction session was last week, this is my last newsletter of the academic year and my schedule has plenty of empty space on it for the first time in months.

That empty space, however, gets filled up quickly with all the tasks that don’t get accomplished during the busy semester.  One of those tasks, is spending up my budget!  Last month, I mentioned that our spending freeze had thawed and asked for your help in making a dent in that unspent money.  I had thought that I had until June to do my spending, but I have a deadline of May 14!

I know that many of you are busy with end-0f-semester grading and instruction, but if you could take a moment and help me identify resources to support your teaching and your students learning I would greatly appreciate your input.  If you would like to be notified when your requested items are available in the Library, just let me know– we’ll send you an email to let you know that the materials are ready and we can even put them on the hold shelf for you.

I have a good amount of money for both audio/visual materials (CDs, CD-ROMs, DVDs) and print materials, so tell me your favorites, the best of what you’ve seen at conferences, expos, in catalogs and on the web.  I’m happy to look into anything!

When I’m not looking for new ways to spend money, I’ve been working with our Library intern, Joy Norton, to compile easy-to-use lists of graded readers and short stories.  These annotated lists will be available on the ESL and ABE/GED Research Guides and will make it easier for students to identify the high-interest, low-vocabulary materials that suit them.   Do you use graded readers in your curriculum?  Are your students required to find short-stories for assignments?  Let me know your recommendations and I’ll add them to the list.

I wish everyone a wonderful summer.  Enjoy the break between the semesters and if you’re teaching this summer, don’t forget to schedule your class visit to the Library!  I’ll be here the whole summer and can help you incorporate Library resources into your curriculum or simply give your students a tour.  Send me an email, give me a call or just stop by.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Resource Roundup: 2009/2010

April 2, 2010

April 2010 Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Tags: , — Jenn @ 9:46 am

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

April 2010

Spring Thaw– no April Fool’s joke!

It seems that every year I post two very interrelated stories to this newsletter.  The first one– generally written at the start of the academic year– asks you to send your requests for new materials.  The follow-up– unhappily quick on the heels of the former– apologizes and explains that our collection development budget has been frozen and I won’t be able to purchase anything new for our collection.

I’m happy to say that our recent warm weather has coincided with a budget thaw and I now have some money to spend again!  While I am always happy to hear your request for books, videos, audio, and any other resources you would like for your or your students’ use, I’m especially eager to receive your wish lists now that I can actually act on them!  I know it’s a busy time in the semester, so if you’d like to put this request on the back burner, I’ll be more than happy to send a reminder in June!

While my ABE/GED/ESL budget was sitting untouched, I spent some time exploring some of the great free educational resources we often promote in the Library.  If you haven’t visited the online newsletter in a while, be sure to take a look at my entries on Free Online Media and Films on Demand and learn more about the videos and audio you can easily share with your students or use in any “smart” classroom.

In other news, the Grass Roots Easy Reader series that I promised is finally available in the Library!  We have two series: 4 Humor stories and 4 Romance stories.  These high–interest, low vocabulary readers are at the grade 1 level and feature just 1 or 2 sentences per page.  If you and your students are interested in seeing more books like these, just let me know– Grass Roots has a total of 24 easy readers.

Books to Look For

Novel Scenes:

  • Low intermediate, Rooms with a view / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N684 2010 
  • High beginning, Holding the bag / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N683 2010
  • Low beginning, In a tight spot / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N682 2010
  • Low beginning, In a tight spot / Ann Gianola : PE1128 .N682 2010
Oxford Readers

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library- Workplace

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library- Academics

Oxford Picture Dictionary Reading Library – Civics:

Oxford Bookworms Library Starter level:

  • Escape Phillip Burrows and Mark Foster : PE1126.N43 B877 2008
  • Drive into danger Rosemary Border ; illustrated by Simon Gurr : PE1126.N43 B673 2008
Endeavor Series:
  • Endeavor. 8 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E528 2009
  • Endeavor. 7 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E547 2009
  • Endeavor. 6 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E526 2009
  • Endeavor. 5 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E525 2009
  • Endeavor. 4 / contributing author, Vista Resources, Inc. ; development : PE1128 .E524 2009

Resource of the Month

FREE:  Federal Resources for Educational Excellence

FREE is a directory of of freely available teaching and learning resources from the federal government arranged by subject area.  Looking for photos to illustrate a history lesson?  Videos that demonstrate a scientific process?  FREE points you to places where you can find them.

Sources include NASA, the National Gallery of Art, PBS, the National Science Foundation, Library of Congress, the Education Department and more.  Subjects cover Art & Music, Science, Math, U.S. History, Health & Phys. Ed.,  World Studies, and U.S. Time Periods.

The number of topics covered is impressive and the choices of sites for each topic really highlights the breadth of information and the number of tools that are provided by the federal government for educational purposes.  Exploring each source in order to find these tools would be a daunting task– FREE makes it easy and fun to browse and find inspiration.

December 2, 2009

December Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 12:14 pm

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

December 2009

Making a List, Checking it Twice

One of my favorite things to do as a librarian is collection development. On one level, it’s shopping– flipping through catalogs, browsing websites, scanning displays, and making wish lists and placing orders. When my ordered items arrive, it’s a bit like Christmas– new stuff! What fun!

The other part of collection development is weeding– the closet cleaning part of the job. We all like getting new things, but sometimes it’s not as much fun to get rid of the old stuff. It was great when we got it, maybe it will be great again. Sure it hasn’t left the shelf in a year, but it might come in handy some other time. These excuses might sound familiar to someone who can’t bear to part with the bags of out-of-date clothes or unused still-in-the-box appliances that take up space in attics, closets and basements.

Some things that should get thrown out stay because there simply isn’t a replacement. The Library holds on to any number of cassettes, VHS tapes and even slide carousels (!) because 21st century versions aren’t available. If a student really needs the content, he or she will have this dated version to turn to (and a librarian to help explain how it works!).

As the semester winds down into Winter Break, I’m spending some time purchasing and weeding. I have a stack of catalogs I haven’t had time to review and a budget that has barely been touched. Perhaps it’s the lingering effects of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but I’m in full holiday spending mode. This month would be a great time for you to send me your own Wish Lists– are there books you wish we had? resources your students look for? tools that could help you do your job?

I’m also looking for your favorite ESL/ABE/GED publishers? Who, do you trust? Who has the best offerings at conferences? To whom do you turn year after year for quality materials? Send along your favorites by email or in the comments of the online newsletter. I’ve listed some of my favorites below– visit their sites, do some window shopping and send your wish lists my way!

Happy Holidays and enjoy your winter breaks!

–Jenn.

Grass Roots Press www.grassrootsbooks.net

Heinle ELT www.elt.heinle.com

New Readers Press www.newreaderspress.com

Oxford University Press www.oup.com/us

Test Taking Resources

Learning Express Library:  This electronic resource is one of the best known and most used test-preparation tools the Library offers.  LEL not only offers practice for students taking named exams such as the GED, TOEFL or occupational exams, but can assist students with placement test through the many skills improvement sections.

GED Prep: Search the Library catalog for “General Educational Development Tests Study Guides” and find over 60 books, DVDs and interactive tools for GED and pre-GED exam prep.  Many books and videos are also available in Spanish versions.  These materials are available in the Library’s College and Career Information Center.

Math Placement Test:

Videos

Books and Textbooks

Writing Placement Test:

Reading Placement Test:


Resource of the Month

Teachers’ Domain

From Teachers’ Domain: “Teachers’ Domain is an online library of more than 1,000 free media resources from the best in public television.  These classroom resources, featuring media from NOVA, Frontline, Design Squad, American Experience, and other public broadcasting and content partners are easy to use and correlate to state and national standards.”

The content on Teachers’ Domain is geared for K-12 education, but the media resources and handouts can be used to reinforce learning for students of any age.  Subjects include Arts, English, Math, Science, and Social Science.  All media (audio, video, web pages) have accompanying information, depending on the subject– background essays, detailed lesson plans,   discussion/follow-up questions, and more.  Registration is free, quick and easy.

September 28, 2009

October Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 4:38 pm

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

October 2009


Library Cards

When our students begin a semester of classes, they generally start off with a number of school supplies. Whether they purchase new notebooks, pens and pencils or just dig through desk drawers to find a sharp pencil, most students know the importance of arriving prepared with the tools they need to learn.

The stores may have aisles filled with the products we’ve come to expect at the start of the school season, but one essential tool for students in not available at the supermarket, drug store or even Amazon.com– the Library card.

A Library card is as essential a learning tool as a calculator or a textbook– often it becomes invaluable when those items can’t be obtained when necessary. Did you know that students can borrow calculators for in-Library use with their Library cards? Did you know that you can put a copy of your course textbook on reserve for students who have to wait for financial aid awards before they can afford to purchase their own? These are just two of the out-of-the-ordinary things you and your students can do with a Library card.

These days, when money is tight for everyone, a Library card can provide students, faculty and staff with many money-saving options– from inexpensive entertainment options (DVD rentals for $1) to free access to newspapers, magazines and learning tools.

September was Library Card Sign-up Month, but it’s never to late to encourage your students to get a card. All they need is a photo ID, proof of present address (a drivers license will cover both) and a copy of their current class schedule. Students with C.O.D. IDs can have their IDs activated as Library cards at the Circulation Desk.

Students at Westmont, Addison, Naperville, and Bloomingdale can get their cards directly from the front desks at these off-campus centers.

You can also get cards for your entire class by having your students fill out a Library Card application– contact me directly and I will email you the form. Simply return the completed applications to me with a copy of your class roster via campus mail– we’ll send your students’ cards back to at your mailbox location or mail the cards directly to your students.

I hope that you will encourage your students to get and use a C.O.D. Library card. In addition to the materials that can help support their studies, students will have access to a wide range of books, periodicals, films and music

Free (or Cheap) Fun for your Students

Movies

  • The Library’s Feature Film Catalog has thousands of titles including movies of every genre, international films, TV shows and more. Popular films rent for $1 for 1 week. DVDs are excellent tools for English language learners.
  • The Library has a sizable collection streaming media, too– online educational films and documentaries. Also, take a look at the database “Theater in Video” for drama fans.

Music

  • Students can borrow CDs from the Library and enjoy classical, jazz, movie soundtracks, world music and more.
  • Real audiophiles can come into the Library and explore our record collection. Nearby turntables with comfortable couches provide a relaxing atmosphere for easy listening.
  • Music Online is a fantastic database for music lovers, featuring streaming audio, video, reference, and even musical scores. Many genres are represented in the following collections: Classical Music Library Smithsonian Global Sound American Song African American Music and Contemporary World Music. There are even weekly free downloads!

Magazines and Newspapers

  • Students can keep up to date with local and national news through the Library’s many newspaper databases. In addition to the scholarly journals you may already use, the Library also has America’s News Magazines— a database that includes Time, U.S. News and World Report, Parenting, Sports Illustrated, Real Simple and more!

Resource of the Month

Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/about/my-best-of-series/

Although high school teacher Larry Ferlazzo has created his website for ESL teaching and learning, his Best Of series is a great directory of tools for instructors and students of any subject.

Organized by subject, the Best Of series presents links to Ferlazzo’s favorite websites. His reviews and recommendations are quick by thorough. For example, The Best Websites To Teach & Learn Life Skills is a top ten list of websites with one or two sentences describing each.

Hyperlinks, while subtle and easy to miss, take you directly to the recommended sites. Ferlazzo is also very good at providing links to related Best Of lists. His Life Skills list refers readers to The Best Websites For Students Exploring Jobs & Careers and The Best Sites For Learning Economics & Practical Money Skills.

Websites cover both a wide range of topics and a wide range of interests– you and your students can use these tools to enhance learning, to explore resources, express creativity, as well as sharpen computer literacy skills.

One word of warning: Ferlazzo has been reviewing sites since 2007, so some older lists (and certainly some newer ones, as well) may refer to extinct sites or contain dead links. With many recommendations in each subject, however, you’re almost sure to find a gem that sparkles.

August 19, 2009

September Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Genneaux @ 2:38 pm

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

September 2009


Welcome Back!

For those of you who don’t know me, I’m Jennifer Kelley, the library liaison for the ESL, ABE and GED programs. I’m your contact person in the Library and also someone to whom you can refer your students. Below, you’ll see a short list of “What Your Librarian Can Do for You”– these are just a few of the things I can help you with!

One of my favorite things to do for my faculty is to share this newsletter with you. Every month, you can count on an update on Library news, lists of new or notable materials (books, videos, software), a recommended electronic resource, and more.

I’ll email you a link to the online newsletter as soon as it’s available, but you can always visit any time you like at https://codlibraryell.wordpress.com. There you can see archived newsletters, the occasional newsflash update and a long list of online resources for you to explore. You can even share your comments and questions right on the website! If you’re more of a traditional print-out paper kind of person, don’t worry! I always attach a PDF of the newsletter to the monthly email, as well.

What Your Librarian Can Do for You

  • Help you to identify and locate ESL and ABE/GED resources for teaching and student use.
  • Support your students’ Library instruction via customized group sessions, library tours, and library card acquisition.
  • Collaborate with instructors on the design and development of student assignments.
  • Find information to answer basic reference questions as well as assist you in locating information for ESL and ABE/GED curriculum related projects.
  • Assist you in finding and securing library materials from other libraries through Interlibrary Loan.

Library Tours and Orientations

Each semester, I look forward to meeting and working with the students taking ESL, ABE and GED classes. You can schedule a Library tour or orientation for your students at any time during the school year, but I recommend getting them started early so they can take advantage of our resources immediately.

A library session can be short or the entire length of your class. It can involve a research project or a simple assignment. It can take place here in the Library or in your classroom– even if you’re off campus!

Take a look at our Library Orientation menus for some ideas of the sessions and activities we can offer your students:

If you can’t fit a Library visit or activity into your schedule this semester, don’t worry– your students can still get an introduction to the Library. This fall, we’re offering 50-minute Library Orientation sessions, every Monday through Saturday between August 31 and September 14th.

Orientation logoThese classes will cover all the basics that new students need to get started in the Library– from getting a Library card to using the online catalog to find books, movies and more.

Students can register in-person at the Reference Desk, by phone (630) 942-3364, or online at http://services.codlibrary.org/emailpage/orientation.php

Sessions are geared toward traditional students, but will surely benefit higher-level ESL students as well as ABE and GED students looking to familiarize themselves with Library services.

Resource of the Month

The Internet Public Library takes the guesswork out of the internet. Having trouble finding reliable online resources? Students using junk websites for assignments? IPL collects the best and most trustworthy examples of reference websites and makes them available in an easy-to-use website.

Users can search IPL as they would Google to find related entries or browse through the Subject Collections, Ready Reference, Reading Room and more.

IPL not only provides great online research and study tools, but they also index and provide links to online newspapers from around the world. The site is fun and easy to use.

April 30, 2009

May Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 2:01 pm

librarylogo

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

May 2009


End of the Year

As I’m drafting this newsletter, the weather reports indicate that today will be the first 80 degree day of the year, so my mind has already moved on to summer even though we do still have a couple weeks until the end of the semester.
I’m sure we’re all looking forward to a warm sunny break (or at least a warm sunny weekend), so this final newsletter of the semester will wind us down from a long winter and slow-to-warm spring with a bit of fun.

I recently came across a blog called Movie Segments to Assess Grammar Goals, containing the lesson plans and video clips that an English language teacher in Brazil uses with his students.  The blog also includes tips on how to use your own DVD collection to create engaging classroom activities of your own.  The film segments available on the website range from action/thrillers to comedy to animation– but all of them are popular movies that you and your students will recognize and enjoy watching.  The C.O.D. Library has many of these videos (see below) if you prefer to use DVDs in your classroom rather the online clips.

Another fun use of movies for teaching language is called English Trailers , a website that uses popular movie teasers to encourage students to listen, write and talk about topics that interest them.

Finally, I’ve also included a film project as this month’s online resource.  As the semester winds down, this combination of movies and learning seems just about the right speed.

I hope the semester wraps up well for everyone and that you all have an enjoyable summer.  I’ll be here in the Library over the summer, so feel free to contact me with questions, requests for class Library visits and orientations or just to say hello.

Summer Movie Season

Wall-E
After hundreds of lonely years, a waste management robot finds a new purpose in life. With only a cockroach for a friend, he finds true love in another robot sent on a mission to Earth to see if it is safe for human life

Ratatouille
A rat named Remy dreams of becoming a great chef despite his family’s wishes and the obvious problem of being a rat in a decidedly rodent-phobic profession. When fate places Remy in Paris, he finds himself ideally situated beneath a restaurant made famous by his culinary hero. Despite the apparent dangers of being an unwanted visitor in the kitchen of one of Paris’ most exclusive restaurants, Remy forms an unlikely partnership with Linguini, the garbage boy, who inadvertently discovers Remy’s amazing talents. They strike a deal, ultimately setting into motion a chain of extraordinary events that turns the culinary world of Paris upside down


The Game Plan
Superstar quarterback Joe Kingman has an ego bigger than a football field. Joe is getting ready for a run at the big championship game when the 8-year-old daughter he never knew existed shows up at his not-so-family-friendly bachelor pad. As the big game gets closer, he begins to realize the most meaningful win he can achieve is the heart of the one little fan who counts the most

Kung Fu Panda
Po works in his family’s noodle shop while dreaming the day away about becoming a Kung Fu master. His dreams soon become reality when he is unexpectedly chosen to join the world of Kung Fu and study along side his idols. Before they know it, the vengeful and treacherous snow leopard Tai Lung is headed their way. It is now up to Po to defend everyone from the oncoming threat

I Am Legend
Robert Neville is the last human survivor in what is left of New York City. A pandemic has left only 1% of the population alive and most of those who survived are no longer human. The infected, now lurking in the shadows, watch Neville’s every move. Perhaps mankind’s last, best hope, Neville is driven by the only one remaining mission– to find a way to reverse the effects of the virus using his own immune blood

The Ultimate Gift
Jason thought his inheritance was going to be the gift of money and
lots of it. Was he ever in for a big surprise. Based on the best-selling book “The Ultimate Gift” by Jim Stovall, the story sends trust fund baby Jason Stevens on an improbable journey of discovery, having to answer the ultimate question: “What is the relationship between wealth and happiness?”


Resource of the Month

“The Learning English Video Project is a 7-part documentary series about people learning English in different countries around the world. Made by independent UK filmmaker Daniel Emmerson, the series features students from across the world who have different methods and reasons for learning English. The students’ methodological approaches and grounds for learning are often determined by their geographical and social situation. These are the key aspects that the series focuses on, and by doing so it provides an entertaining and educational glimpse into the global ESL community.”

EnglishClub.com

April 2, 2009

April Newsletter

Filed under: Newsletter — Jenn @ 5:14 pm

librarylogo

C.O.D. Library ESL/ABE/GED Faculty Newsletter

April 2009

Speaking of Speaking

March was clearly pronunciation month and I celebrated by compiling quite a few lists of Library materials that we have, that I recommend, that I wonder why we have, and that I wonder why we don’t have.  I had several requests from instructors for phonics resources, speaking skills books, A/V materials for pronunciation, and the like.  Unfortunately, a lot of what we have are in formats that a lot of our students look at and say “what is this?”

That might be an exaggeration– students do know what audio cassettes and VHS tapes are, but chances are they don’t have the tape players and VCRs to use them (although, in one instance, I was with a student when we found a slide carousel in a box on the shelf and she literally had no idea what it was!).  With budget constraints the way they are, I don’t have much hope of updating our A/V materials this semester, but I am keeping a running list of replacements and wish list items for next year!

While pronunciation materials might be the focus of our ESL students, speaking skills resources might be of interest to some of our adult learners.  Speaking skills books and videos hit on everything from overcoming shyness and insecurity to organizing speeches and wowing your audience with captivating presentations.  Returning students can use these resources to help gain the confidence they need to succeed in the classroom as well as in real life situations.

ESL/ABE/GED Speaking Skills & Pronunciation Resources

Conquering Communication Anxiety (DVD)
Author: Jessica Stowell
Call #:
PN4088 .S833 no.2 2005

10 simple solutions to shyness : How to overcome shyness, social anxiety & fear of public speaking
Author: Martin M. Antony
Call #: BF575.B3 A577 2004

Speaking to be understood : English as a first or second language
Author: Lillian Brown

Call #: PN4129.15 .B76 2003

Presentation skills : The essential guide for students
Author: Patsy McCarthy and Caroline Hatcher
Call#: PN4121 .M22 2002

Public speaking in a second language : Fear not (DVD)
Author: Susan Steinbach
Call #:
PN4129.15 .P83 2006

Sounds and rhythm : a pronunciation course (book w. cassettes)
Author: W.D. Sheeler, R.W. Markley
Call #: PE1137 .S37 1991

Perfect English pronunciation (VHS)
Author: produced by Donald W. Novey and Eilleen
Call #: PE1137 .P4 1991

Pronunciation power (book w. CD-ROM)
Call #: PE1137 .P76 2000

Pronounce it perfectly in English (CD)
Author: Jean Yates
Call #: PE1137 .Y384 2005

English pronunciation made simple
Author: Paulette Dale, Lillian Poms
Call #: PE1137 .D34 2005

Pronunciation plus  (CD)
Author:
Martin Hewings, Sharon Goldstein
Call #: PE1137 .H44 2001

Clear speech from the start : basic pronunciation and listen (CD)
Judy B. Gilbert
PE1128 .G5183 2001

Resource of the Month

ELLLO stands for English Language Learning Lab Online, an interactive website where students can hone their skills by listening to natural conversations spoken with a wide variety of accents– American and international. Audio files are accompanied by images, an interactive quiz, transcripts and downloadable MP3.

In addition to the over 900 (and growing) interview-conversations, ELLLO features regular updates of at least 5 new activities a week, listening games which “help students listen for gist”, a Newscenter which “can help students learn academic English and develop test taking skills for standardized listening tests”, and songs with lyrics by independent artists.

Elllo is fun, easy to use and contemporary– the activities, images and topics are geared toward college-aged students. The site is the work of a full-time English teacher in Japan and clearly reflects his dedication to developing listening and comprehension skills in students.

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